Maintaining Your AT – Wheelchair Edition

By Lucia Rios, Guest Blogger

Someone resting feet up on an empty wheelchairOne of the most important pieces of assistive technology in my life is the manual wheelchair. It’s the accessory I never leave home without. Wheels enable my independence. Wheeling gives me confidence. Not only has my wheelchair been customized to fit me, but each ding, scratch and tear tells a deeper story of its use.

I use my wheelchair 365 days a year. I use my wheelchair from the moment I wake up until the time comes for sleep. That’s a lot of time!

Yet my wheelchair is not just an object to get me from one place to another, it’s part of my world and loved.  Just like a car, a manual wheelchair can only take so much. I think a wheelchair undergoes more abuse than a car because the demands of its use are constant. And yet it’s like owning a car – you’ve got to keep it running.

I must admit that I’m totally clueless when it comes to maintaining a car, which is why I use a mechanic. You can ask for referrals from friends and there seem to be many options on places to take your car. However, I realized that durable medical equipment providers – such as Airway Oxygen and CareLink – are not always the easiest to connect with or affordable when on a budget.

Let’s be honest, it’s an expense to own a car and the same goes for maintaining a wheelchair. As I started to utilize my wheelchair more often I noticed the upkeep took time, money and problem solving.  I’m not one to keep my information to myself, so here are solutions I learned along the way.

Bike Shops

road bike hanging in repair shopTo be honest I didn’t think of this solution by myself.  While interacting with a new friend – who also uses a wheelchair – I told my woes about wheelchair maintenance. Having to make an appointment at the medical equipment provider, high costs, etc.  He asked if I thought about using a bike shop.  I hadn’t.  

So I started visiting bike shops.  I asked for help airing my tires, and inquired about buying tires for my chair.  The first pair I bought were under $30 and there was no service fee to put them on!  I was hooked.  I ditched the medical equipment venues and went to my local bike store for all my wheelchair maintenance needs.  

Tires, lights to use at night, tightening of spokes and unexpected flats – the bike store was my go to.  Better yet, I didn’t have to schedule an appointment!  With each request I was treated with dignity, charged a reasonable fee, and air was always free!           

Online Stores

When I was being fitted for a new wheelchair – which is exciting because at that point my wheelchair is on its last spin – I hear what insurance considers “extras”.  

  • Tires with better traction for snow – an extra $100 to upgrade.
  • Vibrant colors – insurance won’t cover your preferred choice so you’ll have an out-of-pocket expense.
  • A bag to hold personal items – sorry you’ll have to pay $50 for a standard black tote.
  • And the list goes on.  

Frustrated and looking for a cheaper solution I went online.  I was excited to see their were options for a wheelchair user that were not only affordable, but trendy.

Social Media

I’m a huge fan of social media, especially when it comes to spreading awareness about the disability experience.  Being able to use pictures to explain barriers that I face in my day-to-day life has been a great way to educate, but also challenge others to think of their environments.  Facebook has also been a go to when I’ve run into problems with flat tires, inaccessible venues and a quick way to ask for assistance!  

Once my tires went flat while I was at the store.  I typed a quick message on Facebook, asking if anyone knew of an open bike store – it was business service hours.  Within minutes I had offers to assist, website addresses to bike shops, and a person willing to pick me up!  I took up a friends offer and met him at the local brewery so he could patch up my tire.  He fixed it, bought me a beer and gave me my own small tire repair kit!  

So, I’m curious, what maintenance tips do you have for your AT?

Author: Kathryn Wyeth

Kathryn Wyeth started working at MDRC in the summer of 1994. She's worked with the Michigan Assistive Technology Program since the fall of 1997 and is currently the AT Team Leader.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s