The Coolest Halloween Costumes Include AT!

By MATP Staffer Laura Hall

I have to admit, this is my favorite blog post of the year.  For the past few years, each Halloween, I have written a blog that features Halloween costumes that incorporate mobility devices and other AT into them.  Every year I find costumes that are more innovative than the year before.  Not only is it a fun topic, but it gives me a good feeling because these costumes represent not only pride in one’s disability identity but pride in one’s assistive technology as well.  So often, ableism and internalized ableism makes people feel as though their assistive technology is something shameful or something that should be hidden.  By creating a costume that uses AT in its design, it is a way of claiming your assistive technology, and your disability with pride.  So without further ado here are the top five Halloween costumes I wish I had thought of as a kid.

C’Mon Down!

Boy in wheelchair with Wheel of Fortune wheel on his wheel covers. He is holding a $5000 wheel piece.

A Giraffe in its Natural Habitat

Girl in a giraffe costume. Her crutches make up the front long legs

Winter is Coming

Young man in a powerchair wearing clothing from the series "Game of Thrones". His wheelchair is fashioned to look like the Iron Throne

No High Sticking!

Young child in wheelchair wearing a hockey jersey and holding a hockey stick. His wheelchair is surrounded by a penalty box

My Little Pony Chariot

Girl in her wheelchair that has rainbow wheels, a cloud surrounding the chair, being pulled by a "My Little Pony"

Halloween is a special time for many kids and Magic Wheelchair is an organization that strives to make it, as they say, “epic”.  A volunteer group of designers and builders work together to create extra special costumes for kids with disabilities picked through an application process each year.  The My Little Pony costume above is an example of their magic.

Costumes are not the only barrier for people with disabilities on Halloween.  The Connecting for Kids website has helpful considerations to think about related to creating an inclusive Halloween.  For example:

  • Keep in mind that children who are nonverbal may not be able to say “trick-or-treat” or “thank you.” Do not push for verbal responses and be sensitive to children who do not give expected social feedback.
  • Be prepared to describe treats for children with blindness or low vision issues.
  • Make sure that you are handing out treats in a well-lit, accessible area. If your house is not accessible, consider handing out treats in a different location (for example, in the driveway or in a community common area).
  • When addressing trick-or-treaters, make sure they can see your face and mouth as you speak. This can help children who struggle with speech and hearing issues. Better still, learn some simple Halloween signs (video).
  • Be observant. Children with anxiety or other issues may wander from a caregiver or safe area.

Happy Halloween!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s